When holiday time arrives, many owners find themselves with the problem of how to care for their four-legged friends during their absence. If you are unable to leave your dog with family or friends, the next best thing is placing them in a boarding kennel. Dog owners are urged to call and inspect the establishment of their choice well before their departure so as to assess its suitability.
Combing and brushing dogs regularly is essential, particularly for longhaired breeds. It is best to establish this habit early in a dog’s life so that grooming becomes part of the routine. Grooming removes dust, dead skin, loose hairs, grass seeds, and tangles. It also assists to shorten the coat moult, which occurs every autumn and spring. Brushing helps keep your dog cool in summer months and reduces the amount of hair your dog sheds. Dogs with short coats also require some brushing.
Fleas are a common external parasite associated with dogs. They cause severe itching and inflammation of the skin, leading to dermatitis. They are the intermediate host for the Tapeworm most common in dogs. If fleas are a problem, it is necessary to treat all animals in the household (both cats and dogs) to clean the environment. You may also want to ‘flea bomb’ the house to remove any eggs and to stop the cycle. Preventative programs are best achieved using “spot on” products that have a prolonged residual effect, usually 30 days. However it is strongly advised to consult your Vet or chat with the RSPCA's friendly Vet nurse team for free advice about the most suitable product for your pet.
Regular socialisation and training, from as early as eight weeks of age, is an important factor in raising a well-behaved and socially acceptable dog. New puppy owners will benefit from enrolling their pups in a Puppy Pre-school class as soon as they bring their four-legged friend home. The RSPCA Pet Dog Manners class may also benefit your 4 legged friend!
If dogs live indoors they need to be provided with a dog bed. Most dogs though are hardy enough to sleep outdoors in a well-built, well-furnished and weatherproof kennel. The kennel should be warm, dry and draught free, elevated from the ground, near the house and human activity but not in a thoroughfare. It should be protected from rain and excessive sun, and the bedding should be changed regularly. Washable rugs, cushions or blankets are suitable as bedding.
Vomiting is not a disease or disorder in itself; it is a clinical sign of some type of digestive disturbance or as a result of another disease or disorder. Occasional bouts of vomiting can be considered normal but if the vomiting persists and is accompanied by severe or bloody diarrhoea, lethargy, weakness, depression, pain or fever then this is a sign that something is seriously wrong and veterinary attention is required.  Vomiting can be caused by something the dog has eaten (e.g. rotten food), ingestion of toxins, adverse reactions to drugs or an allergic reaction to something in the environment.
When holiday time arrives, many owners find themselves with the problem of how to care for their four-legged friends during their absence. If you are unable to leave your dog with family or friends, the next best thing is placing them in a boarding kennel. Dog owners are urged to call and inspect the establishment of their choice well before their departure so as to assess its suitability.

Diarrhoea is similar to vomiting in that it is a clinical sign rather than a disease itself. Diarrhoea can be a sign of a mild digestive upset or of something more serious e.g. food poisoning or ingestion of other toxic materials. Acute and chronic diarrhoea can be life threatening, particularly in puppies or older dogs. If the diarrhoea lasts longer than a couple of hours, contains blood and the dog appears to be in pain and has a fever then veterinary attention is required immediately. Treatment in this case will include identification and appropriate treatment for the underlying condition causing the diarrhoea as well as fluid and electrolyte therapy. Mild cases can be treated at home by removing food for a period of 12 hours and then re-introducing small amounts of bland food (e.g. chicken and rice). Probiotics can also be a useful addition to improve the overall health of the affected dog’s intestines.
Picture this: you're at work. You've been there all day. You have a deadline which will keep you back, and your dog hasn't seen anyone for eight hours. Many Dog Owners will sadly recognise this sensation; but fortunately, it's now an experience which can belong to yesterday. Via Mad Paws, you can source quality Dog Day Care providers in Elizabeth Hills NSW. Now, instead of suffering under the terror of isolation, your pup can enjoy exercise, games, and attention all day long. Behold some of the advantages of Dog Day Care:
There are various intestinal worms that can infect dogs and cats, with hook worms, round worms (ascarids), whip worms (mainly in dogs) and tapeworms being the main groups. Symptoms can include diarrhoea, bloody stools, weight loss, anaemia, pot belly, dry hair and/or general poor appearance. If left untreated, worm infestations can be fatal. Worms can be picked up from the mother (either in utero or via milk), from the environment (infected stools), from eating infected prey (lizard or mouse), or, in the case of tapeworms, from fleas. Worms can also be transmitted to humans.
Diarrhoea is similar to vomiting in that it is a clinical sign rather than a disease itself. Diarrhoea can be a sign of a mild digestive upset or of something more serious e.g. food poisoning or ingestion of other toxic materials. Acute and chronic diarrhoea can be life threatening, particularly in puppies or older dogs. If the diarrhoea lasts longer than a couple of hours, contains blood and the dog appears to be in pain and has a fever then veterinary attention is required immediately. Treatment in this case will include identification and appropriate treatment for the underlying condition causing the diarrhoea as well as fluid and electrolyte therapy. Mild cases can be treated at home by removing food for a period of 12 hours and then re-introducing small amounts of bland food (e.g. chicken and rice). Probiotics can also be a useful addition to improve the overall health of the affected dog’s intestines.
If you are not home during the day, your dog should be kept secure in a dog-proof fenced yard and should never be left unsupervised when tethered. In the case of larger properties where this is not possible, then an appropriately fenced dog-run should be constructed, and the dog kennel, along with a plentiful supply of fresh water, should be placed within the run.
The RSPCA recommends that you do not purchase a dog from markets or places where large numbers of dogs are kept for sale. Dogs sold from these establishments are very rarely examined by a veterinarian, and therefore may not be entirely healthy. Never purchase a puppy that looks unwell and if you are concerned about the welfare of the animal, contact the RSPCA Inspectorate. 
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