Vomiting is not a disease or disorder in itself; it is a clinical sign of some type of digestive disturbance or as a result of another disease or disorder. Occasional bouts of vomiting can be considered normal but if the vomiting persists and is accompanied by severe or bloody diarrhoea, lethargy, weakness, depression, pain or fever then this is a sign that something is seriously wrong and veterinary attention is required.  Vomiting can be caused by something the dog has eaten (e.g. rotten food), ingestion of toxins, adverse reactions to drugs or an allergic reaction to something in the environment.
Keep your dog busy by prolonging his mealtime with a number of interactive toys such as Kongs, treatballs, or Bustercubes (treats can be easily pushed in but will engage your dog for hours trying to get them out). Also try hiding part of his meal around the yard to stimulate his natural foraging instincts. Treats and toys are available at the RSPCA online shop.
As a dog owner you are fully and legally responsible for any harm or damages caused by your dog. If your dog bites a human, kills wildlife, damages property, causes a traffic accident, creates noise or other pollution, or is the direct cause of any other damage to the community, you may have to shoulder a substantial financial (if not legal) penalty. It is in your best interest then to always keep a vigilant eye on your dog in public and provide him with the obedience training and socialisation skills necessary to become a well-mannered and socially well-adjusted dog.

Service rates will vary in price depending on the age and size of the pet, the number of pets, and the length of the stay. Make sure you read all the information on the Sitter’s profile before making a booking. We also strongly recommend completing a Meet & Greet; it will allow you to discuss the details of the booking as well as meet the Pet Sitter prior to the booking.
The simplest and most economical diet consists of a mixture of meat (raw, cooked or canned) and dry food. Premium dry food such as Hill's Science Diet (available at RSPCA clinics and shelters) are balanced and also good for your dog’s teeth. In order to maintain healthy teeth and gums, a mixture of both soft and hard food should be provided.What is wrong with just feeding my dog meat? 
During summer, a flea control shampoo and a flea rinse should be used. However, this should by no means substitute a proper monthly flea control regime such as Spot-On, Revolution or Frontline. Consult your vet or chat with the RSPCA's friendly vet nurse team for free advice on flea control for your pet. It's important to remember, after the application of flea treatment be sure to wait 24-48 hours before bathing your dog.
Doggy day care is day time care while you are busy at work or otherwise occupied. Pawshake pet sitters offer doggy day care for your dog in their home. Have a free meet and greet with the individual pet sitter who will be looking after your dog and view the environment your dog will be spending time in. Depending on the sitter you choose, you can also have the option for your dog to be the only dog or organise for your dog to socialise with a small group of dogs.

The RSPCA recommends that you do not purchase a dog from markets or places where large numbers of dogs are kept for sale. Dogs sold from these establishments are very rarely examined by a veterinarian, and therefore may not be entirely healthy. Never purchase a puppy that looks unwell and if you are concerned about the welfare of the animal, contact the RSPCA Inspectorate.


Our pet sitters don’t operate like a traditional dog day care centre – instead, you can choose the individual pet sitter who will be providing one-on-one dog day care services for your furry friend. Does your dog not get along with other dogs? Arrange dog day care with a pet sitter that only takes in single bookings at a time. Alternatively, your dog can make new friends during doggy day care – but usually only a maximum of 2 or 3 dogs at a time.
Giardia intestinalis and Giardia duodenalis are single celled protozoan parasites, which inhabit the affected dog’s small intestine, causing clinical signs of Gardiasis. The protozoa attach themselves to the intestines and multiply. They may be directly swept through the intestines and appear in the infected dog’s faeces or they may develop into a tougher more durable ‘cyst’ form, which is again passed in the dogs faeces but is able to survive for long periods in the external environment. Dogs are infected by ingesting the cysts from contaminated water and the environment. Infected dogs may not show any clinical signs of Gardiasis, but they can still shed the protozoa from their systems, spreading the infection to other healthy animals.   Infection and subsequent illness is more commonly seen in younger animals. Signs of infection include: chronic or intermittent diarrhoea that may appear ‘fatty’ and slimy, accompanied by a very foul smell. Weight loss is also possible if left untreated.
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