Doggy day care is day time care while you are busy at work or otherwise occupied. Pawshake pet sitters offer doggy day care for your dog in their home. Have a free meet and greet with the individual pet sitter who will be looking after your dog and view the environment your dog will be spending time in. Depending on the sitter you choose, you can also have the option for your dog to be the only dog or organise for your dog to socialise with a small group of dogs.
If you are not home during the day, your dog should be kept secure in a dog-proof fenced yard and should never be left unsupervised when tethered. In the case of larger properties where this is not possible, then an appropriately fenced dog-run should be constructed, and the dog kennel, along with a plentiful supply of fresh water, should be placed within the run.
It is important to buy your dog from a reputable source. Purchase your dog from a reputable dog breeder, visit an RSPCA Adoption Centre or a local animal welfare shelter such as the RSPCA where lots of happy and healthy dogs are looking for loving new homes. If you are looking to adopt a dog from a breeder, make sure you read our Smart Puppy Buyers Guide.
Our pet sitters don’t operate like a traditional dog day care centre – instead, you can choose the individual pet sitter who will be providing one-on-one dog day care services for your furry friend. Does your dog not get along with other dogs? Arrange dog day care with a pet sitter that only takes in single bookings at a time. Alternatively, your dog can make new friends during doggy day care – but usually only a maximum of 2 or 3 dogs at a time.
Our pet sitters don’t operate like a traditional dog day care centre – instead, you can choose the individual pet sitter who will be providing one-on-one dog day care services for your furry friend. Does your dog not get along with other dogs? Arrange dog day care with a pet sitter that only takes in single bookings at a time. Alternatively, your dog can make new friends during doggy day care – but usually only a maximum of 2 or 3 dogs at a time.

However, if you decide to keep your dog outdoors, it is important to consider how you'll ensure it receives the appropriate amount of human contact (particularly during those cold winter months in which we'd all much rather stay snuggled inside rather than playing fetch with our pals in the cold!). An option could be to enlist the service of a dog walker. Also, if you work long hours or are sometimes forced to take overnight trips, it may be useful to consider "doggy day care" facilities to ensure that your dog receives the TLC and companionship it will need in your absence.
Giardia intestinalis and Giardia duodenalis are single celled protozoan parasites, which inhabit the affected dog’s small intestine, causing clinical signs of Gardiasis. The protozoa attach themselves to the intestines and multiply. They may be directly swept through the intestines and appear in the infected dog’s faeces or they may develop into a tougher more durable ‘cyst’ form, which is again passed in the dogs faeces but is able to survive for long periods in the external environment. Dogs are infected by ingesting the cysts from contaminated water and the environment. Infected dogs may not show any clinical signs of Gardiasis, but they can still shed the protozoa from their systems, spreading the infection to other healthy animals.   Infection and subsequent illness is more commonly seen in younger animals. Signs of infection include: chronic or intermittent diarrhoea that may appear ‘fatty’ and slimy, accompanied by a very foul smell. Weight loss is also possible if left untreated.
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