As a dog owner you are fully and legally responsible for any harm or damages caused by your dog. If your dog bites a human, kills wildlife, damages property, causes a traffic accident, creates noise or other pollution, or is the direct cause of any other damage to the community, you may have to shoulder a substantial financial (if not legal) penalty. It is in your best interest then to always keep a vigilant eye on your dog in public and provide him with the obedience training and socialisation skills necessary to become a well-mannered and socially well-adjusted dog.
Ideally, dogs should be taken to council-designated areas where they can be safely let off the leash to run free. It is important to use these specifically designated areas not only to ensure their own safety (preventing the risk of being hit by a car) but also the safety of farm livestock and wildlife which can be threatened by a dog let loose in their habitat.

The RSPCA recommends that you do not purchase a dog from markets or places where large numbers of dogs are kept for sale. Dogs sold from these establishments are very rarely examined by a veterinarian, and therefore may not be entirely healthy. Never purchase a puppy that looks unwell and if you are concerned about the welfare of the animal, contact the RSPCA Inspectorate.


Diarrhoea is similar to vomiting in that it is a clinical sign rather than a disease itself. Diarrhoea can be a sign of a mild digestive upset or of something more serious e.g. food poisoning or ingestion of other toxic materials. Acute and chronic diarrhoea can be life threatening, particularly in puppies or older dogs. If the diarrhoea lasts longer than a couple of hours, contains blood and the dog appears to be in pain and has a fever then veterinary attention is required immediately. Treatment in this case will include identification and appropriate treatment for the underlying condition causing the diarrhoea as well as fluid and electrolyte therapy. Mild cases can be treated at home by removing food for a period of 12 hours and then re-introducing small amounts of bland food (e.g. chicken and rice). Probiotics can also be a useful addition to improve the overall health of the affected dog’s intestines.
Ideally, dogs should be taken to council-designated areas where they can be safely let off the leash to run free. It is important to use these specifically designated areas not only to ensure their own safety (preventing the risk of being hit by a car) but also the safety of farm livestock and wildlife which can be threatened by a dog let loose in their habitat.
Dogs are social animals that need companionship, so most don’t enjoy being left alone during the day. Being alone for long periods can lead to stress and even separation anxiety, but this can easily be avoided by booking dog care services through Pawshake. Your sitter will keep your pooch happy during the day with plenty of love and belly rubs! As a bonus, your dog will return home tired and happy.
Vomiting is not a disease or disorder in itself; it is a clinical sign of some type of digestive disturbance or as a result of another disease or disorder. Occasional bouts of vomiting can be considered normal but if the vomiting persists and is accompanied by severe or bloody diarrhoea, lethargy, weakness, depression, pain or fever then this is a sign that something is seriously wrong and veterinary attention is required.  Vomiting can be caused by something the dog has eaten (e.g. rotten food), ingestion of toxins, adverse reactions to drugs or an allergic reaction to something in the environment.
The expression 'man's best friend' is truly fitting in describing one of man's most loyal and loving four-legged companions. Owning a dog is part of the Australian way of life - providing companionship, loyalty, and bundles of love for people of all ages, dogs are an invaluable addition to the family. Nonetheless, it is important to think carefully about the responsibility of dog ownership before you adopt or purchase a dog.
The RSPCA recommends that you do not purchase a dog from markets or places where large numbers of dogs are kept for sale. Dogs sold from these establishments are very rarely examined by a veterinarian, and therefore may not be entirely healthy. Never purchase a puppy that looks unwell and if you are concerned about the welfare of the animal, contact the RSPCA Inspectorate.
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