As a dog owner you are fully and legally responsible for any harm or damages caused by your dog. If your dog bites a human, kills wildlife, damages property, causes a traffic accident, creates noise or other pollution, or is the direct cause of any other damage to the community, you may have to shoulder a substantial financial (if not legal) penalty. It is in your best interest then to always keep a vigilant eye on your dog in public and provide him with the obedience training and socialisation skills necessary to become a well-mannered and socially well-adjusted dog.
As a dog owner you are fully and legally responsible for any harm or damages caused by your dog. If your dog bites a human, kills wildlife, damages property, causes a traffic accident, creates noise or other pollution, or is the direct cause of any other damage to the community, you may have to shoulder a substantial financial (if not legal) penalty. It is in your best interest then to always keep a vigilant eye on your dog in public and provide him with the obedience training and socialisation skills necessary to become a well-mannered and socially well-adjusted dog.

It is important to note however that dogs who are never, or seldom allowed indoors, are more likely to become bored - and as a result become disruptive (e.g. bark for attention) and/or destructive (e.g. dig up your newly- planted rose bush). This is because dogs associate their human family as their pack and can develop behavioural issues if they feel neglected as a consequence of being excluded from interacting with their pack.

If dogs live indoors they need to be provided with a dog bed. Most dogs though are hardy enough to sleep outdoors in a well-built, well-furnished and weatherproof kennel. The kennel should be warm, dry and draught free, elevated from the ground, near the house and human activity but not in a thoroughfare. It should be protected from rain and excessive sun, and the bedding should be changed regularly. Washable rugs, cushions or blankets are suitable as bedding.
Our pet sitters don’t operate like a traditional dog day care centre – instead, you can choose the individual pet sitter who will be providing one-on-one dog day care services for your furry friend. Does your dog not get along with other dogs? Arrange dog day care with a pet sitter that only takes in single bookings at a time. Alternatively, your dog can make new friends during doggy day care – but usually only a maximum of 2 or 3 dogs at a time.
A dedicated pet sitter is a great option for in home dog day care when your family or friends are too busy. Many pet owners are uncomfortable asking their neighbours for dog day care help: a Pawshake pet sitter will be happy to provide dog day care when you can’t. Pawshake pet sitters are genuinely love pets and are there to help with your dog day care needs.
Regular socialisation and training, from as early as eight weeks of age, is an important factor in raising a well-behaved and socially acceptable dog. New puppy owners will benefit from enrolling their pups in a Puppy Pre-school class as soon as they bring their four-legged friend home. The RSPCA Pet Dog Manners class may also benefit your 4 legged friend!

Confidence – At your local kennel, your dog will face variables. For instance, you won't know whether the rostered staff have ever even met or cared for your pup before. This isn't a problem you'll face with Mad Paws' Dog Daycare. Rather, your trusted Pet Sitter will make the effort to familiarise themselves with your dog and provide tailored care.

It is important to buy your dog from a reputable source. Purchase your dog from a reputable dog breeder, visit an RSPCA Adoption Centre or a local animal welfare shelter such as the RSPCA where lots of happy and healthy dogs are looking for loving new homes. If you are looking to adopt a dog from a breeder, make sure you read our Smart Puppy Buyers Guide.
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