Ideally, dogs should be taken to council-designated areas where they can be safely let off the leash to run free. It is important to use these specifically designated areas not only to ensure their own safety (preventing the risk of being hit by a car) but also the safety of farm livestock and wildlife which can be threatened by a dog let loose in their habitat.
There are various intestinal worms that can infect dogs and cats, with hook worms, round worms (ascarids), whip worms (mainly in dogs) and tapeworms being the main groups. Symptoms can include diarrhoea, bloody stools, weight loss, anaemia, pot belly, dry hair and/or general poor appearance. If left untreated, worm infestations can be fatal. Worms can be picked up from the mother (either in utero or via milk), from the environment (infected stools), from eating infected prey (lizard or mouse), or, in the case of tapeworms, from fleas. Worms can also be transmitted to humans.
Service rates will vary in price depending on the age and size of the pet, the number of pets, and the length of the stay. Make sure you read all the information on the Sitter’s profile before making a booking. We also strongly recommend completing a Meet & Greet; it will allow you to discuss the details of the booking as well as meet the Pet Sitter prior to the booking.
It’s important to maintain a healthy skin and coat, and dogs of any age can suffer from arthritis and joint issues. Calming aids can ease anxiety, whether situational or hereditary. It’s always good to have basic first aid and wound care items handy, and dental care products can make regular teeth maintenance easy. For long-term solutions, we even carry syringes and needles, pilling aids, and more to save you too many trips to the vet.

The RSPCA recommends that you do not purchase a dog from markets or places where large numbers of dogs are kept for sale. Dogs sold from these establishments are very rarely examined by a veterinarian, and therefore may not be entirely healthy. Never purchase a puppy that looks unwell and if you are concerned about the welfare of the animal, contact the RSPCA Inspectorate.
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