However, if you decide to keep your dog outdoors, it is important to consider how you'll ensure it receives the appropriate amount of human contact (particularly during those cold winter months in which we'd all much rather stay snuggled inside rather than playing fetch with our pals in the cold!). An option could be to enlist the service of a dog walker. Also, if you work long hours or are sometimes forced to take overnight trips, it may be useful to consider "doggy day care" facilities to ensure that your dog receives the TLC and companionship it will need in your absence.

The RSPCA recommends that you do not purchase a dog from markets or places where large numbers of dogs are kept for sale. Dogs sold from these establishments are very rarely examined by a veterinarian, and therefore may not be entirely healthy. Never purchase a puppy that looks unwell and if you are concerned about the welfare of the animal, contact the RSPCA Inspectorate.
Dogs frequently suffer from infestations of intestinal parasites – commonly known as worms. The most common types are roundworms, hookworms, tapeworms and whipworms. Each different type of worm has its own specific lifecycle and can damage a dog’s health in different ways. Clinical signs of an excessive worm burden include: diarrhoea, vomiting, poor coat condition, weight loss and general lethargy. Some types of worms can remain in a dogs system and no outward signs of infestation will be apparent. Intestinal worms can be treated with anthelmintics (de-worming medication). Regular use of appropriate anthelmintics every 3 months is recommended.
As a dog owner you are fully and legally responsible for any harm or damages caused by your dog. If your dog bites a human, kills wildlife, damages property, causes a traffic accident, creates noise or other pollution, or is the direct cause of any other damage to the community, you may have to shoulder a substantial financial (if not legal) penalty. It is in your best interest then to always keep a vigilant eye on your dog in public and provide him with the obedience training and socialisation skills necessary to become a well-mannered and socially well-adjusted dog.
Male dogs are often quite independent and can be a little more difficult to train and control. Males also tend to wander and fight other dogs. Female dogs are more popular as family pets and may cost a little more. By nature females are affectionate and companionable, but unless desexed, will attract male dogs when in season and may reproduce every six months.
A dedicated pet sitter is a great option for in home dog day care when your family or friends are too busy. Many pet owners are uncomfortable asking their neighbours for dog day care help: a Pawshake pet sitter will be happy to provide dog day care when you can’t. Pawshake pet sitters are genuinely love pets and are there to help with your dog day care needs.
Bones are necessary to keep your dogs teeth healthy and clean and also provide lots of fun for your canine friend if you are away. A large marrowbone cleans their teeth, massages their gums, and often becomes your dog's most treasured possession. You should provide your dog with a regular supply of bones for mouth and dental hygiene (raw chicken wings/necks are best).  Never give your dog cooked bones, as these could be more brittle and easily splinter, causing harm to your dog.    You should also ensure that there is always plenty of fresh and clean water for your dog. Sometimes bowls get knocked over and therefore to be safe it is recommended that you always provide two. In the summer months, like people, dogs need a lot more water to keep hydrated so make sure there water bowls are always full and kept in the shade.
At Mad Paws, the safety of our Pet Sitters, Pet Owners, and their pets is of the utmost importance. We want our Pet Sitters to be able to provide a fun and safe service, but not need to foot a veterinary bill in an emergency. This is why we provide Mad Paws Accident Cover, which protects all Pet Sitting services booked in through the Mad Paws website.

Lungworm larvae may be present in slugs and snails, and if eaten, pets may be infected with worms that make their way to the lungs, where they block airways and make breathing difficult. Most dog wormers don't claim to treat lungworm, although some cat wormers do. Research conducted internationally has found moxidectin, which is found in some heartworm treatments for dogs, to be effective against lungworm, but this claim can't be made for dogs on packaging in Australia. Check with your vet as to whether it's an issue in your area, and discuss the best preventative treatment.
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