Dogs are social animals that need companionship, so most don’t enjoy being left alone during the day. Being alone for long periods can lead to stress and even separation anxiety, but this can easily be avoided by booking dog care services through Pawshake. Your sitter will keep your pooch happy during the day with plenty of love and belly rubs! As a bonus, your dog will return home tired and happy.
Confidence – At your local kennel, your dog will face variables. For instance, you won't know whether the rostered staff have ever even met or cared for your pup before. This isn't a problem you'll face with Mad Paws' Dog Daycare. Rather, your trusted Pet Sitter will make the effort to familiarise themselves with your dog and provide tailored care.
In PetCare Pet Insurance we have made claims easier, you just need fill out the form online and send us your vet bills. Your veterinary clinic may help you to submit your claims online. There is no contribution from your side , you will be reimbursed 100% of the cost  less any excess, and can be claimed up to your policy limit per year ( Sub limits and waiting periods apply)
Doggy day care is day time care while you are busy at work or otherwise occupied. Pawshake pet sitters offer doggy day care for your dog in their home. Have a free meet and greet with the individual pet sitter who will be looking after your dog and view the environment your dog will be spending time in. Depending on the sitter you choose, you can also have the option for your dog to be the only dog or organise for your dog to socialise with a small group of dogs.

Ideally, dogs should be taken to council-designated areas where they can be safely let off the leash to run free. It is important to use these specifically designated areas not only to ensure their own safety (preventing the risk of being hit by a car) but also the safety of farm livestock and wildlife which can be threatened by a dog let loose in their habitat.
Vomiting is not a disease or disorder in itself; it is a clinical sign of some type of digestive disturbance or as a result of another disease or disorder. Occasional bouts of vomiting can be considered normal but if the vomiting persists and is accompanied by severe or bloody diarrhoea, lethargy, weakness, depression, pain or fever then this is a sign that something is seriously wrong and veterinary attention is required.  Vomiting can be caused by something the dog has eaten (e.g. rotten food), ingestion of toxins, adverse reactions to drugs or an allergic reaction to something in the environment.

If you are not home during the day, your dog should be kept secure in a dog-proof fenced yard and should never be left unsupervised when tethered. In the case of larger properties where this is not possible, then an appropriately fenced dog-run should be constructed, and the dog kennel, along with a plentiful supply of fresh water, should be placed within the run.


The key method to adopt here is one of positive reinforcement. Firstly, you need to show your pup the area where it should do its business, and each time the pup toilets in the designated area, immediately reward with a treat or verbal praise. In order to prevent mistakes from happening, it is important to both diligently supervise your dog while it is indoors and take it frequently outdoors. This will speed the learning process and prevent any accidents from occurring in the house.
The information given is for general information and should not be regarded as advice in any matter. ACS Distance Education disclaims all and any liability in relation to any act or omission which is done in reliance to the information provided in this web site. While every effort is made to ensure that we display correct information on our website, errors can occur. ACS Distance Education disclaims liability or responsibility for orders or complaints arising from such errors, including (but not limited to): pricing, fees and course requirements. ACS Distance Education reserves the right to decline orders arising from such errors.
Giardia intestinalis and Giardia duodenalis are single celled protozoan parasites, which inhabit the affected dog’s small intestine, causing clinical signs of Gardiasis. The protozoa attach themselves to the intestines and multiply. They may be directly swept through the intestines and appear in the infected dog’s faeces or they may develop into a tougher more durable ‘cyst’ form, which is again passed in the dogs faeces but is able to survive for long periods in the external environment. Dogs are infected by ingesting the cysts from contaminated water and the environment. Infected dogs may not show any clinical signs of Gardiasis, but they can still shed the protozoa from their systems, spreading the infection to other healthy animals.   Infection and subsequent illness is more commonly seen in younger animals. Signs of infection include: chronic or intermittent diarrhoea that may appear ‘fatty’ and slimy, accompanied by a very foul smell. Weight loss is also possible if left untreated.
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